SADN Dissemination Workgroup Presentation at American Public Health Association’s APHA 2017 Annual Meeting & Expo

Prepare to Tweet: Making Nurses Disaster-Ready

The SADN Dissemination Workgroup is presenting on its work to promote the Society for the Advancement of Disaster Nursing (SADN) at the American Public Health Association’s APHA 2017 Annual Meeting & Expo (Nov. 4 – Nov. 8) in Atlanta. If you are coming to these meetings, please join us at the Public Health Nursing Section Session:

4347.0: Disaster Preparation, Response, and Recovery

Tuesday, November 07, 201702:30 PM – 04:00 PM

Georgia World Congress Center – B309

To hear more about the accomplishments of the  SADN Dissemination Workgroup, come listen to the 3:30 presentation: ‘Prepare to Tweet: Making Nurses Disaster-Ready’ at this session. The advancement of disaster nursing, including activation of a new organization with national impact is an enormous and crucial undertaking. The Dissemination Workgroup’s efforts may serve as a model for advancement of large initiatives and newly formed organizations. 

 

 

A Thank You Note to Volunteers Who Support Disaster Response

A Thank You Note to Volunteers Who Support Disaster Response

By Anne “Belle” Griffin, MPH,BSN, RN

Clara Barton was 60 years old and working in the U.S. Patent Office in Washington DC when the U.S. Civil War broke out. Realizing the wounded soldiers needed early intervention, she gathered first aid supplies and volunteered herself to care for them on the front line of war. Over the next several years and despite many obstacles, Clara Barton was determined to assure that the U.S. would sign and commit to the Geneva Convention Treaty in 1881, establishing the American Red Cross with its mission to protect the sick and wounded during times of war.1 Today, there are 20,000 volunteer Red Cross nurses who are committed to serving in disaster response, health and safety instruction and program development.2

Recent disasters continue to present opportunities for the same kind of commitment. Hurricane Harvey recently caused overwhelming damage to 40 counties in south eastern Texas. Hurricanes Irma and Maria were right behind, wreaking havoc on the infrastructure of Florida, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Devastating fires in northern California followed. In less than a two-month period, the American Red Cross received over 5,000 new applications from health and mental health volunteers3. Active Red Cross volunteers have provided nearly 195,000 mental health and health services to support and care for those affected by each of the hurricanes and fires.4 Social media outlets provide evidence of the many nurses who have worked well beyond their obligation to support continuity of patient care.

It has now been three years since Veterans Emergency Management Evaluation Center invited 18 nursing leaders with disaster nursing expertise to develop strategies to assure our nursing workforce is prepared to respond to disaster.5 This effort evolved into the Society for the Advancement of Disaster Nursing (SADN) and a strong sense of volunteerism has driven its success. The initiative is expanding and the number of volunteers have more than doubled.

Whether it be in the field, in a hospital or in a classroom; SADN wishes to thank those who serve as volunteers and dedicate their time, expertise and energy to be of service to those who are impacted by random and devastating disasters.

1-http://www.redcross.org/about-us/who-we-are/history/clara-barton

2-http://www.redcross.org/about-us/who-we-are/history/nursing

3-http://www.redcross.org/take-a-class/lp/hurricane-harvey-health-professionals

4-http://www.redcross.org/news/article/Our-Response-to-Harvey-and-Irma

5- Veenema, T. G., Griffin, A., Gable, A. R., MacIntyre, L., Simons, R. A. D. M., Couig, M. P., … & Larson, E. (2016). Nurses as leaders in disaster preparedness and response—a call to action. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 48(2), 187-200. Link to Abstract

 

Stop the Bleed

My Nursing Education

As nurses, we must be prepared for mass casualty incidents and know how to respond. It was good to see the people trained in first aid (firemen, prior military, nurses, and others) respond and help even as the shooter was still firing. Would you be prepared to stop the bleed of a person with a gunshot wound?

You can follow these easy steps, but it important to practice in advance. While there are videos online they do not replace hands-on training. If you want to be trained you can contact your local school of nursing, EMS, or Red Cross. You can purchase a stop the bleed kit on Amazon.com or through the American Red Cross. Just search “Stop the Bleed”.  If you are in the St. Louis area feel free to reach me at the University of Missouri – St. Louis, College of Nursing and I will be happy to…

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